Read e-book Embracing the Now: Finding Peace and Happiness in What Is

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online Embracing the Now: Finding Peace and Happiness in What Is file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with Embracing the Now: Finding Peace and Happiness in What Is book. Happy reading Embracing the Now: Finding Peace and Happiness in What Is Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF Embracing the Now: Finding Peace and Happiness in What Is at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF Embracing the Now: Finding Peace and Happiness in What Is Pocket Guide.

However, I also have a more general and concrete idea of happiness: a combination of inner peace, economic development, and, above all, world peace. To achieve such goals I feel it is necessary to develop a sense of universal responsibility, a deep concern for all irrespective of creed, colour, sex, or nationality. The premise behind this idea of universal responsibility is the simple fact that, in general terms, all others' desires are the same as mine. Every being wants happiness and does not want suffering.

If we, as intelligent human beings, do not accept this fact, there will be more and more suffering on this planet.


  • Embracing the Growth to Your Higher Nature – Unity Church in Albany.
  • Embrace The Now: Finding Happiness & Peace In Your Current Situation.
  • ADVERTISEMENT.

If we adopt a self-centred approach to life and constantly try to use others for our own self-interest, we may gain temporary benefits, but in the long run we will not succeed in achieving even personal happiness, and world peace will be completely out of the question. In their quest for happiness, humans have used different methods, which all too often have been cruel and repellent. Behaving in ways utterly unbecoming to their status as humans, they inflict suffering upon fellow humans and other living beings for their own selfish gains.

Learn more about our specialized publishing options

In the end, such shortsighted actions bring suffering to oneself as well as to others. To be born a human being is a rare event in itself, and it is wise to use this opportunity as effectively and skillfully as possible. We must have the proper perspective that of the universal life process, so that the happiness or glory of one person or group is not sought at the expense of others. All this calls for a new approach to global problems. The world is becoming smaller and smaller - and more and more interdependent - as a result of rapid technological advances and international trade as well as increasing trans-national relations.

We now depend very much on each other. In ancient times problems were mostly family-size, and they were naturally tackled at the family level, but the situation has changed. Today we are so interdependent, so closely interconnected with each other, that without a sense of universal responsibility, a feeling of universal brotherhood and sisterhood, and an understanding and belief that we really are part of one big human family, we cannot hope to overcome the dangers to our very existence - let alone bring about peace and happiness.

One nation's problems can no longer be satisfactorily solved by itself alone; too much depends on the interest, attitude, and cooperation of other nations. A universal humanitarian approach to world problems seems the only sound basis for world peace. What does this mean? We begin from the recognition mentioned previously that all beings cherish happiness and do not want suffering.

It then becomes both morally wrong and pragmatically unwise to pursue only one's own happiness oblivious to the feelings and aspirations of all others who surround us as members of the same human family. The wiser course is to think of others also when pursuing our own happiness. This will lead to what I call 'wise self-interest', which hopefully will transform itself into 'compromised self-interest', or better still, 'mutual interest'.

Although the increasing interdependence among nations might be expected to generate more sympathetic cooperation, it is difficult to achieve a spirit of genuine cooperation as long as people remain indifferent to the feelings and happiness of others. When people are motivated mostly by greed and jealousy, it is not possible for them to live in harmony.

A spiritual approach may not solve all the political problems that have been caused by the existing self-centered approach, but in the long run it will overcome the very basis of the problems that we face today. On the other hand, if humankind continues to approach its problems considering only temporary expediency, future generations will have to face tremendous difficulties.

The global population is increasing, and our resources are being rapidly depleted. Look at the trees, for example. No one knows exactly what adverse effects massive deforestation will have on the climate, the soil, and global ecology as a whole. We are facing problems because people are concentrating only on their short-term, selfish interests, not thinking of the entire human family. They are not thinking of the earth and the long-term effects on universal life as a whole.

If we of the present generation do not think about these now, future generations may not be able to cope with them. According to Buddhist psychology, most of our troubles are due to our passionate desire for and attachment to things that we misapprehend as enduring entities. The pursuit of the objects of our desire and attachment involves the use of aggression and competitiveness as supposedly efficacious instruments.

Dealing With Anger, Resistance And Pessimism

These mental processes easily translate into actions, breeding belligerence as an obvious effect. Such processes have been going on in the human mind since time immemorial, but their execution has become more effective under modern conditions. What can we do to control and regulate these 'poisons' - delusion, greed, and aggression? For it is these poisons that are behind almost every trouble in the world.

As one brought up in the Mahayana Buddhist tradition, I feel that love and compassion are the moral fabric of world peace. Let me first define what I mean by compassion. When you have pity or compassion for a very poor person, you are showing sympathy because he or she is poor; your compassion is based on altruistic considerations.

On the other hand, love towards your wife, your husband, your children, or a close friend is usually based on attachment. When your attachment changes, your kindness also changes; it may disappear. This is not true love. Real love is not based on attachment, but on altruism. In this case your compassion will remain as a humane response to suffering as long as beings continue to suffer. This type of compassion is what we must strive to cultivate in ourselves, and we must develop it from a limited amount to the limitless.

Undiscriminating, spontaneous, and unlimited compassion for all sentient beings is obviously not the usual love that one has for friends or family, which is alloyed with ignorance, desire, and attachment. The kind of love we should advocate is this wider love that you can have even for someone who has done harm to you: your enemy.

The rationale for compassion is that every one of us wants to avoid suffering and gain happiness. This, in turn, is based on the valid feeling of '1', which determines the universal desire for happiness. Indeed, all beings are born with similar desires and should have an equal right to fulfill them. If I compare myself with others, who are countless, I feel that others are more important because I am just one person whereas others are many. Further, the Tibetan Buddhist tradition teaches us to view all sentient beings as our dear mothers and to show our gratitude by loving them all.

For, according to Buddhist theory, we are born and reborn countless numbers of times, and it is conceivable that each being has been our parent at one time or another. In this way all beings in the universe share a family relationship. Whether one believes in religion or not, there is no one who does not appreciate love and compassion.

Right from the moment of our birth, we are under the care and kindness of our parents; later in life, when facing the sufferings of disease and old age, we are again dependent on the kindness of others. If at the beginning and end of our lives we depend upon others' kindness, why then in the middle should we not act kindly towards others? The development of a kind heart a feeling of closeness for all human beings does not involve the religiosity we normally associate with conventional religious practice.

It is not only for people who believe in religion, but is for everyone regardless of race, religion, or political affiliation. It is for anyone who considers himself or herself, above all, a member of the human family and who sees things from this larger and longer perspective. This is a powerful feeling that we should develop and apply; instead, we often neglect it, particularly in our prime years when we experience a false sense of security.

When we take into account a longer perspective, the fact that all wish to gain happiness and avoid suffering, and keep in mind our relative unimportance in relation to countless others, we can conclude that it is worthwhile to share our possessions with others. When you train in this sort of outlook, a true sense of compassion - a true sense of love and respect for others - becomes possible.

Individual happiness ceases to be a conscious self-seeking effort; it becomes an automatic and far superior by-product of the whole process of loving and serving others. Another result of spiritual development, most useful in day-to-day life, is that it gives a calmness and presence of mind. Our lives are in constant flux, bringing many difficulties. When faced with a calm and clear mind, problems can be successfully resolved.

When, instead, we lose control over our minds through hatred, selfishness, jealousy, and anger, we lose our sense of judgement. Our minds are blinded and at those wild moments anything can happen, including war. Thus, the practice of compassion and wisdom is useful to all, especially to those responsible for running national affairs, in whose hands lie the power and opportunity to create the structure of world peace.

The principles discussed so far are in accordance with the ethical teachings of all world religions. I maintain that every major religion of the world - Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Hinduism, Islam, Jainism, Judaism, Sikhism, Taoism, Zoroastrianism - has similar ideals of love, the same goal of benefiting humanity through spiritual practice, and the same effect of making their followers into better human beings. All religions teach moral precepts for perfecting the functions of mind, body, and speech.

All teach us not to lie or steal or take others' lives, and so on. The common goal of all moral precepts laid down by the great teachers of humanity is unselfishness. The great teachers wanted to lead their followers away from the paths of negative deeds caused by ignorance and to introduce them to paths of goodness. All religions agree upon the necessity to control the undisciplined mind that harbours selfishness and other roots of trouble, and each teaches a path leading to a spiritual state that is peaceful, disciplined, ethical, and wise.

It is in this sense that I believe all religions have essentially the same message. Differences of dogma may be ascribed to differences of time and circumstance as well as cultural influences; indeed, there is no end to scholastic argument when we consider the purely metaphysical side of religion. However, it is much more beneficial to try to implement in daily life the shared precepts for goodness taught by all religions rather than to argue about minor differences in approach.

There are many different religions to bring comfort and happiness to humanity in much the same way as there are particular treatments for different diseases. For, all religions endeavour in their own way to help living beings avoid misery and gain happiness. And, although we can find causes for preferring certain interpretations of religious truths, there is much greater cause for unity, stemming from the human heart. Each religion works in its own way to lessen human suffering and contribute to world civilization.

Conversion is not the point. For instance, I do not think of converting others to Buddhism or merely furthering the Buddhist cause. Rather, I try to think of how I as a Buddhist humanitarian can contribute to human happiness. While pointing out the fundamental similarities between world religions, I do not advocate one particular religion at the expense of all others, nor do I seek a new 'world religion'.

All the different religions of the world are needed to enrich human experience and world civilization. Our human minds, being of different calibre and disposition, need different approaches to peace and happiness. It is just like food.


  1. Life After a Spiritual Awakening.
  2. The Art of Now: Six Steps to Living in the Moment | Psychology Today.
  3. What is Inner Peace?;
  4. Bosnian Refugees in America: New Communities, New Cultures.
  5. Certain people find Christianity more appealing, others prefer Buddhism because there is no creator in it and everything depends upon your own actions. We can make similar arguments for other religions as well. Thus, the point is clear: humanity needs all the world's religions to suit the ways of life, diverse spiritual needs, and inherited national traditions of individual human beings.

    It is from this perspective that I welcome efforts being made in various parts of the world for better understanding among religions. The need for this is particularly urgent now. If all religions make the betterment of humanity their main concern, then they can easily work together in harmony for world peace. Interfaith understanding will bring about the unity necessary for all religions to work together. However, although this is indeed an important step, we must remember that there are no quick or easy solutions.

    We cannot hide the doctrinal differences that exist among various faiths, nor can we hope to replace the existing religions by a new universal belief. Each religion has its own distinctive contributions to make, and each in its own way is suitable to a particular group of people as they understand life.

    The world needs them all. There are two primary tasks facing religious practitioners who are concerned with world peace. First, we must promote better interfaith understanding so as to create a workable degree of unity among all religions. This may be achieved in part by respecting each other's beliefs and by emphasizing our common concern for human well-being. Second, we must bring about a viable consensus on basic spiritual values that touch every human heart and enhance general human happiness.

    This means we must emphasize the common denominator of all world religions - humanitarian ideals. These two steps will enable us to act both individually and together to create the necessary spiritual conditions for world peace. We practitioners of different faiths can work together for world peace when we view different religions as essentially instruments to develop a good heart - love and respect for others, a true sense of community.

    The most important thing is to look at the purpose of religion and not at the details of theology or metaphysics, which can lead to mere intellectualism. I believe that all the major religions of the world can contribute to world peace and work together for the benefit of humanity if we put aside subtle metaphysical differences, which are really the internal business of each religion. Despite the progressive secularization brought about by worldwide modernization and despite systematic attempts in some parts of the world to destroy spiritual values, the vast majority of humanity continues to believe in one religion or another.

    The undying faith in religion, evident even under irreligious political systems, clearly demonstrates the potency of religion as such. This spiritual energy and power can be purposefully used to bring about the spiritual conditions necessary for world peace. Religious leaders and humanitarians all over the world have a special role to play in this respect. Whether we will be able to achieve world peace or not, we have no choice but to work towards that goal.

    http://4840.ru/components/wie-whatsapp/gofik-was-bedeutet-der.php

    You can now manage your CreateSpace content on Amazon's improved publishing services.

    If our minds are dominated by anger, we will lose the best part of human intelligence - wisdom, the ability to decide between right and wrong. Anger is one of the most serious problems facing the world today. Anger plays no small role in current conflicts such as those in the Middle East, Southeast Asia, the North-South problem, and so forth. These conflicts arise from a failure to understand one another's humanness. The answer is not the development and use of greater military force, nor an arms race. Nor is it purely political or purely technological.

    Basically it is spiritual, in the sense that what is required is a sensitive understanding of our common human situation. Hatred and fighting cannot bring happiness to anyone, even to the winners of battles. Violence always produces misery and thus is essentially counter-productive. It is, therefore, time for world leaders to learn to transcend the differences of race, culture, and ideology and to regard one another through eyes that see the common human situation. To do so would benefit individuals, communities, nations, and the world at large.

    The greater part of present world tension seems to stem from the 'Eastern bloc' versus 'Western bloc' conflict that has been going on since World War II. These two blocs tend to describe and view each other in a totally unfavourable light. This continuing, unreasonable struggle is due to a lack of mutual affection and respect for each other as fellow human beings. Those of the Eastern bloc should reduce their hatred towards the Western bloc because the Western bloc is also made up of human beings - men, women, and children.

    Similarly those of the Western bloc should reduce their hatred towards the Eastern bloc because the Eastern bloc is also human beings. In such a reduction of mutual hatred, the leaders of both blocs have a powerful role to play. Change can open up many doors and opportunities that normally wouldn't have been there without change. Change makes many things possible. It can allow you to meet new people, enjoy new experiences, develop new skills and ideas, learn new knowledge and information, and achieve great feats. Change can help you transform and have breakthroughs. You'll never know what can become and what can happen until you do.

    The possibilities with change become endless. Improvement is impossible without change. Change is necessary for improvement, growth, and development to take place. Embracing and seeking change not only makes sure you keep up with the times and stay up to date, but also allows you to get ahead as well. Change allows for progress to happen. Greatness is more likely when you embrace change. Many people reject change because they claim to be happy already, but with change, they have the potential to be happier.

    Many of us don't know what we're missing out of because we are okay with where we are. Lack of change and resistance to change makes it a lot easier to settle. And that is one of the key reasons why we have so little that becomes great. We don't have great schools, principally because we have good schools. We don't have great government, principally because we have good government. Few people attain great lives, in large part because it is just so easy to settle for a good life.

    When you openly embrace change, it reduces and can eliminate the fears that can come with change. When change pushes us out of our comfort zone, courage grows. We can slowly, but surely overcome our fears by embracing the change that comes from facing our fears.

    Life After a Spiritual Awakening | HuffPost Life

    And yes, those fears can include the fear of change itself. Fear is an illusion in our minds that only stop us from seeking and achieving greater things in life. Acceptance of change makes us more resilient. Resilience makes us stronger and more capable of dealing with life's difficulties. You learn that when there's a change in your life however big it may be, that it's not the end of the world and you'll get through it , probably even better than before.

    We're more equipped and efficacious with what life throws at us because of the changes we've dealt with before. Without change, you can never know what your strengths are and what you are truly capable of. What we learn about ourselves can be surprising to many of us. Embracing change allows you to be okay with change, whether it be negative or positive.

    Some of us can avoid change even if it's positive change and it involves success. Success anxiety is a very real thing. Many of us can feel more relaxed with less responsibility and less success because we are comfortable with how things are now. Success can be scary and uncomfortable.

    When we learn to accept change, we can enjoy the success and good things that come with change and stop self-sabotaging. When you accept, embrace, and seek change, it puts the ball in your court and puts the direction of your life in your own hands. It allows you to be proactive and not reactive. You are no longer a victim controlled by outside forces. You make the choices when you embrace change. Only you are responsible for yourself and your life. Implementing changes makes you more likely to reach your goals, develop your character, and live the life you want to live.

    When you accept change, you stop wasting time and energy complaining about changes that happen around you and instead take the initiative to make your own changes or accept the change and leave it at that. If we take a look at movies and books, most of them have something in common. The main character or the protagonist often goes through change and transformation throughout the story. Without this, there would probably be no book or movie, and we would see the character as bland and boring and perhaps even unlikeable.

    The change s the character goes through often makes them interesting and more likable. The changes that we go through and that we implement into our lives makes us more unique and interesting. The more experiences we've had, the more things we learn, and the more things we go through and get through makes our lives richer and more interesting. Those things even make us seem more interesting to others. Change can not only make life interesting; it can make life exciting.

    Change is exciting! Even when it comes to negative changes in our life, the same applies. Whenever I'm unhappy about something in my life, or I keep messing up and failing, I like to think to myself that the greatest failures make for the best success stories. Change makes you a more developed and well-rounded person. Experiencing change can also make you more open-minded and empathetic which can also improve your relationships with people. When you have more experiences and face difficult and adverse change, you are able to relate to people better and put yourself in their shoes because of the experiences you've had.

    Change gives you more awareness and different perspectives of other people's different experiences and viewpoints that you had never had before. It's harder to relate to people who haven't had very many experiences or haven't faced any of life's challenges. Those people are also going to find it hard to relate to those who have. Even if we have goals and want to reach them, we may still be resistant to change, whether we're aware of it or not.

    When we embrace change, we're more likely to value our ideas and potential possibilities, and then follow through with them. When we value our ideas and goals, we're more likely to believe in ourselves and our abilities.